Johnny’s Punching Combinations List

December 18, 2009 December 18, 2009 by Johnny N Boxing Strategy, Punch Combinations 89 Comments

Punching Combinations

The one and only – ExpertBoxing’s complete list of punching combinations for boxers. This is just a list of combinations only.

It’s not about what punches you throw, it’s how you throw the punches. A basic 1-2 punch combination becomes very deadly when you mix in some variations differing in speed, angle, footwork, timing, and power.

If you need further explanation as to why and how you throw these combinations, please see my other articles on punch combinations.

For counter-punching routines, please click here.

Mix & Match and Enjoy! (Last Updated 2/8/12)

 

 

 

Punch Legend

Each number below represents a punch. (Combinations are for orthodox fighters. There is a small section for southpaws below.)

Punches

1 = jab
2 = right hand
3 = left hook
4 = right hook (or overhand right)
5 = left uppercut
6 = right uppercut
b = body (example: 1b = jab to the body)

Defense

[] = blocking
() = rolling
{} = rolling under
// = slipping or lean away from
<> = pivot away from

Movement

p/pccw = almost all pivots are on the front foot (“p” means pivot clockwise on the frontfoot, pccw means pivot counter-clockwise on the front foot)
bp = backfoot pivot. very rarely used (bpccw means pivot counter-clockwise off your backfoot)
ls/rs = leftstep and rightstep. self-explanatory
bs = backstep (example: 1bs means you backstep as you throw the jab, 1-bs means you backstep AFTER you throw the jab)
f = fake (example: 1f-3 means to fake a jab to the head, and then throw a left hook right after)
t = tap (example: 1t-2 means to throw a light tap jab, followed by a right cross)
sl/sr = slip left, slip right (example: 1-sl-3 means jab, then slip left, then left hook.   1sr-2 means jab as you slip to the right and throw a right hand after)

To use the punching combinations listed below, simply chain the combos in this order:
starter > ender        OR     starter > combo > ender
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Common Punching Combinations

Most commonly used punching combinations inside the boxing ring. (These combinations are complete as is, no need to pick a starter or ender for these.)

1-1

1-1-2

1-2

1-2-1

1-2-1-2

1-2-3-2

1-6-3-2

Starters

These sequences are commonly used to start off your combinations. You are also welcome to start off a combination with a counter-punch. To look up counter-punches, please look up this guide: xxxx

1

1-2

1-6b

2-1

Advanced Combinations

Highly advanced punching combinations that require advanced movement and highly coordinated punching skills.

1-bs-1

1-bs-1-2

In-Fighting

Punching combinations for use up close or when in the clinch.

6-5-2-1p

6-3

6-3p

4b-3b-2-1-2

rs-5

1-2-3b-pivot-4b-4-1

1-4b-3b-6-1

Tricky Starters

Used these combinations to open up highly defensive opponents as you confuse and penetrate their defenses.

1-3-2

1b-2

1-2b

1-2b-3

4-1b

4b-6-3-2 (works best in close range)

bs-2

1f-3

6-2

2-2

1t-2

1t-2t-3

Power Enders

End your punching combinations with these punches to do the most damage to your opponent. Ending with these punch combinations may leave you vulnerable to a counter-punch so beware!

1p-2

 

Evasive Enders

End your punching combinations with these punch series to get you out of harms way safely.

1p

1b-bs

4bpccw (pivot ccw off the backfoot as you throw a right hook)

3p

2-p-2

Punch Combos for Orthodox Against Southpaws (left-handers):

2-2-1bs

1-2b

2-rs-2-1-2b

2-1-2b

1-1-2b-3

 

 

Punch Combos for Southpaws Against Orthodox Boxers

1-2

2-2

2-3-2

2-3-2b

1-1-2b-3

6-1-2

6b-6-2-1

2-1-1-6-1

 

Evasive Combos

1-2-/1/-2

1-2-/1/-2-3-2

1-2-{3}-2

1-2-{3}-/2/-3-2

1-2-{3}-3-2-3

1-2-3-{2}-3-2

1-/1/-2-1-1

1-/1/-2-3-2

 

 

More Useful Boxing Guides on Punch Combinations

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89 Comments

Rick Naz April 12, 2010 at 5:22 pm

Great! I’ll definitely use these.

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idk May 18, 2010 at 3:56 am

really good

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Hector Gil June 14, 2010 at 1:36 pm

Gonzo
would you please reply with the most effective ways to punch in shoe shine combinations

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Johnny N June 14, 2010 at 7:07 pm

shoe shine combinations
Sorry Hector,

I didn’t understand your request. You want to learn how to throw faster flashy combinations? Are you asking for techniques or the exact punches to be used?

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spence November 11, 2012 at 11:10 pm

what does 1-/1/ and 2-{3}-2 mean?

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Johnny N November 13, 2012 at 2:17 pm

1-/1/ means throwing a jab and then slipping the counter jab.

2-{3}-2 means throwing a right cross, then rolling under the counter left hook, then throwing another right cross.

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C September 5, 2010 at 4:57 am

Can u put how to counter and defend that chart u just named
off cuz if I throw a combination and he cou ters I wanna know how
to either defend or recounter is offense like if I throw 1-2-3 then
he slips and counters now me being back on defense show should
I do to counter is offense is there sequences

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Johnny N September 6, 2010 at 4:07 pm

C
I’ll have to write a lot of articles about common counters and punches to watch out for. Because it’s too much information, I won’t put them here but I’ll definitely be writing about it soon!

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Naren singh September 13, 2010 at 8:02 pm

great dude….. i’ll use them…….. Thanks for all ……..

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Alex snowet November 6, 2010 at 3:20 pm

Blue wizard
8):D:-);-)8)8)8)

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--- December 13, 2010 at 7:37 am

BOXING
6 IS THE OVERHAND RIGHT

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--- December 13, 2010 at 7:41 am

BOXING
LEFT JAB RIGHT STRAIGHT LEFT HOOK RIGHT UPPERCUT LEFT UPPERCUT BEAT DOWN (OVERHAND RIGHT)

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peter December 21, 2010 at 2:02 am

this is nice

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TJ February 5, 2011 at 8:35 pm

im orthodox. what’s the best combo for a bigger person?

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Johnny N February 6, 2011 at 4:52 am

For bigger guys, use your footwork and lots of feints to get them to commit. Any combo with a back step or fake in there would be very good for you.

1-2-backstep-2
1-2-1p, and also 1-2-1p-2
1-2b or 1-1-2b or 1-1-2b-1p
when you’re being chased: 1-backstep-2

If it’s a short stocky guy, you use a lot of pivots. If it’s a taller guy, you’ll need more feints.

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shubham February 15, 2011 at 4:25 pm

awesome
8)8);-);-)thery are really cool.but how long it requires in a punching bag for a better workout

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Johnny N February 17, 2011 at 12:39 pm

For a good heavy bag workout, you only need 3 rounds of 3 minutes each with 1 minute rest in between. During the last 30 seconds, try to punch as fast as you can non-stop at the bag–throw just left-right-left-right-left-right.

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ROBERT DELA CRUZ February 23, 2011 at 11:26 am

BOXING
6 IS THE BEAT DOWN (OVERHAND RIGHT)

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Johnny N February 23, 2011 at 2:02 pm

Yes it is, Robert. Depending on who taught you and whichever way you prefer it. Some people don’t even call out overhands, they just feed you the mitt in a way that calls out for it.

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Gonzo March 11, 2011 at 4:36 am

inside fighting – shoe shine
Yes, please show proper inside fighting shoe shine. For instance: 1-1-2 your way in and…

3b-4b-3b dip left
3b-4b-3b-4 dip right
4b-3b-4-3 dip left
5b-4 dip right 4

Thank you.

Gonzo
Hector Gil

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Johnny N March 12, 2011 at 6:40 am

@Gonzo – watch Sugar Ray Leonard vs Marvelous Marvin Hagler. THOSE are perfect shoeshine combinations! Some of them are pure headshots, others start at the bottom and work their way up to headshots.

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lutufyo sanga April 10, 2011 at 10:11 pm

walterweight boxer
i do appreciate online you training you provide cause most of we boxers from subsaharan africa we dont have skilled and critical trainers, this cause most of fighters to lose in international games. so through your programmes i wish i will be the best and make others best. thank you!!!!!!!!

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Johnny N April 11, 2011 at 9:56 am

@lutufyo sanga – that is very unfortunate to hear and I’m honored to be able to help any way that I can. I wish you and your teammates the best of luck.

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May 13, 2011 at 6:33 am

thanks for the website,I’ve studying for the last couple of days.I’m just getting back in the ring after 7yrs and having issues with ring rust.I was an avid boxer once upon a time.any advise on building a good foundation? I’m not as agile as before

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May 13, 2011 at 6:38 am

During my 7 yrs laid off I did a lot of weights ,now I look like frankenstein hitting the bag?

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Johnny N May 13, 2011 at 8:38 am

Just work it slow. Shadowbox slow. Hit the heavybag slow. Spar REALLLLY slow. You’ll be back in no time. I have to deal with ringrust every time I’m away for more than 2 weeks. It sucks but with a little confidence, it comes back every time.

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May 13, 2011 at 2:46 pm

Whats a good instense boxing workout regiment, without overtaining?my primary goal is to focus on technique for now.but, how should I mix roadwork, and with atleast one.day of plyo weight s with out overtrain ing. Sucks I burn myself now probably gonna need a week or two to recover.thanks

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Johnny N May 16, 2011 at 11:53 am

Intense boxing workout coming very VERY soon. The only way to make sure it’s not over-training is for you to know when to stop yourself. Increase the pace slowly.

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avinash June 10, 2011 at 12:33 am

brain damage???
great article and blog man!!!
i want to know if boxing below 18 will actually affect my brain even a bit???
i go for punching big bags in the gym….will it affect my brain???
i am 17 and 5’11” in height….

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Johnny N June 10, 2011 at 8:10 pm

@avinash – If you take hard hits to your head everyday, yes…I’m sure there will be some longterm damage even if just a little. You don’t have to be knocked out to suffer a concussion. I wish I had more expertise in this area but I don’t.

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jose January 15, 2012 at 10:57 am

i kinda swing my body into every punch ..most of them smoothly without using too much energy..only ones i do use alot of energy are left hooks.. do you think thats a good strategy.. im very quick and slick but not very strong or stiff..so im always using my feet in my punches ..and i throw snap punches and after every combo i jump away(not literally jump but smoothly manuver out ) i dont weigh much either I weight 125

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Johnny N January 17, 2012 at 9:27 am

If you make it work, it’s a good strategy.

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sayan July 21, 2013 at 12:34 am

can u post sum other combos..i am very bad at hitting the heavy bag..pls!!!

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Matty B February 4, 2012 at 10:01 am

love the site.

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Mike February 10, 2012 at 2:28 pm

Your passion for boxing and love for sweet science is inspiring and very up lifting:)You are a man with the vision,dream and all the tools to make them come true….persistence,patience,determination and will:)Thank you for contributing to the sport and for helping others to become Champions in the ring and outside of it:)With respect,best luck to you…Mike:)

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Johnny N February 14, 2012 at 3:30 am

Thank you brother.

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spyrosk February 11, 2012 at 7:47 am

keep up the good articles Johny, and thanks for sharing your knowlegde!!

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Danny April 9, 2012 at 10:16 am

In your combination list you refer to under starters a 1-6b but under your legend there is nothing for a plain b could you help with this thank you

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Johnny N April 9, 2012 at 6:31 pm

It shows under punches. “b” = body, so 6b means right uppercut to the body.

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Faith May 11, 2012 at 12:19 pm

Hey Johnny,

Just to clarify, is 2 (“right hand”) just a cross jab? Or is there something I missed?
Also, do you have any combinations that include corkscrews? I know that’s traditionally only used as a block hit when dealing with an under trained fighter or a street fighter who throws wild punches, but it would be cool to see some ways to put a left, right, or even double corkscrew into a combination.

Thanks!
-Faith

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Johnny N May 17, 2012 at 8:13 am

The #2 punch is a right cross. By default, it’s a much harder punch than a jab. As for corkscrews, all straight boxing punches are typically corkscrew punches by default. I am assuming that by “corkscrew”, you mean the fist to be rotated to land with the palm facing down at the floor.

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Vijay June 5, 2012 at 6:21 am

Hii Johny…
I find your combinations very useful & deadly….however, could you suggest some special tactics for shorter guys, like me…
I’m 5’5 by height & play in Light Weight category…Most of the time I face guys, taller than me……so what could be the deadly punch combinations for guys like me…

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Johnny N November 13, 2012 at 2:18 pm

Probably combos with more overhand rights.

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thomas heavy hands ferry October 12, 2014 at 12:11 pm

for shorter guys use a thundering overhand right, again and again. they think you being shorter you cant get to them, then as he learns to block it come in with huge right hooks to body, then as he defends that go back to big overhand rights keep your defense very tight. go in quick get out quick with jab at end of every combo

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James July 10, 2012 at 9:07 pm

Hey Johnny!

I look at these combinations and it has the same style that Jerry is teaching me at La Habra Boxing club.
I understand that he was your first trainer also! Except Jerry always has me follow up on my power punches!

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Johnny N July 14, 2012 at 12:12 am

Hahaha, yeah…Jerry’s all about that left hook right hand follow-up. Is Jerry still at La Habra now?

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James July 23, 2012 at 1:32 pm

Yeah he’s still here teaching anyone who is willing to learn. He stresses hitting to the body a lot! I’ve learned so much from him and I’ve only been training at La Habra for 3 weeks. He also encourages sparring everyday! Haha

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Johnny N July 26, 2012 at 3:12 am

Yeah, that’s exactly how he was with us. You could come in with a broken leg and he’d still strap headgear on you.

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chezyswingle September 21, 2012 at 2:55 am

i’m very happy to discovered this site, so excite.
My nickname is chezyswingle, being called biggy at the gym, i started boxing train 02 march 2012, i love boxing sport so much.

I want to know how people got knocked out, cause i always got knocked out in all my sparring and i dont know why.

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Johnny N September 21, 2012 at 4:45 pm

People get knocked out because their brain took too much impact.

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chezyswingle September 21, 2012 at 2:59 am

needs descriptions on how to combat with my boxers teammate without being knocked out all the time.

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Melinda October 27, 2012 at 1:07 am

Hey there, excellent site, with a great deal of information! If you don’t mind shooting me an email, I’m up here in ak and have some questions, but don’t want to fill your entire wall with them. :) thanks!
Melinda Rae

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Johnny N November 5, 2012 at 4:16 pm

Send it! And then I’ll decide if it’s too many questions.

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rufaro December 7, 2012 at 9:04 am

thanx jonny,im goin to use these combinations as im preparin to move away from the amateur ranks here in zimbabwe.

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Parker January 10, 2013 at 10:45 am

Johnny, I just started boxing, I just wanted to know if you have any beginner tips and to thank you for your amazing site, it has been incredibly helpful for a newbie like me.

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Johnny N January 23, 2013 at 11:07 am

I’ve got plenty of tips. Take a look around all the different categories in the website. The “Beginner’s Guide to Boxing” on the right side is a good place to start.

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Alex W January 14, 2013 at 10:48 am

Is that small section for right-handed or left-handed southpaws?

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Johnny N January 23, 2013 at 11:08 am

The word “southpaw” refers to anybody who stands with their right foot in front and left foot in back.

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Judah Ciervo January 31, 2013 at 5:53 am

I saw a Cus D’Amato combination that was 7-7-1-2-1. I am guessing that the 7 represents a left hook/dig to the body?

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Johnny N January 31, 2013 at 11:02 pm

You’ll have to look up his numbered combinations but yes, I think the 7 might be the left hook to the body or maybe a left uppercut to the head.

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Mike February 25, 2013 at 11:30 am

Thank u verry Much. It helps me Beeing more créative.

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I am the future world champion March 9, 2013 at 3:11 pm

great article dude.

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Jerry March 25, 2013 at 8:05 pm

This pretty much irrelevent to the article but, here it goes. I’ve been boxing since I was 16, I had one fight, lost by decision. I am 23 now, I have had multiple trainers since I began, although I have only had one fight, I want to compete again. Only this time I feel SO ready, afterall, I have been training for 7 years. My question is: do you think age is a limiting factor? Or do you feel that your age has nothing to do with competition, but rather the way you feel and what mental/physical condition you are in, is of utmost importance? I love your website btw thanks for all the great advice! Please email me back at your convenience. Thank you!

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Johnny N April 2, 2013 at 1:49 pm

I don’t know how to answer your question because there are so many examples of good fighters from all ages.

It comes down to whether or not you want to fight.
If you do, then train for it.
If you don’t, then don’t.

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C-4 March 26, 2013 at 4:38 pm

Johnny N,
Love your site, I started Boxing Workouts in Nov 2012, I have follow alot of your teachings, how to’s & tips and I have progress greatly over a short period of time. I totally got the Boxing Bug, My Wife supports me fully and we have even opened a boxing club & gym. We are setting up Coachs and programs to be in full swing very soon. Your site is wonderful and I have shared it with everyone I’ve worked with and plan to continue using it as both myself and our new Boxing Club grow.
Thanks So Much,
E.B. McLlarky “C-4″
Conway Boxing Club
New Hampshire

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C-4 March 26, 2013 at 5:21 pm

KEEP ON ROCKIN’

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Johnny N April 2, 2013 at 1:47 pm

Congratulations C-4!
Let me know when your club and website is fully up and running. I wish you all the best in your business. Keep boxing!

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sid April 5, 2013 at 10:09 am

that was amazing dude can you pls tell me now to develop one punch knockout power

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Johnny N April 11, 2013 at 2:14 pm

Work on all your punching skills. Punching powerfully has to do with technique. But getting a knockout has to do with skills. Timing, accuracy, rhythm, the strategy to setup the shot, the experience to get through your opponent’s defense.

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James April 16, 2013 at 5:47 am

Wow, what a great site. I am 51 years old and just started to fulfill my dream of learning how to box. I hope I did not start to late. I am in excellent physical shape and am a health fanatic. I already have been jumping rope religiously, and hoping this helps. On my off day of private lessons, I practice at home. Can you give me some ideas what to practice, or should I just reinforce what I am learning in the gym? I have at home a speed bag, heavy bag, double end bag and a reflex bag. My trainer said do not be too concerned with the speed bag as yet….I want to learn boxing techniques at my lessons rather than the physical aspect of the sport ( I already train hard on my own time in a gym). My other question is I am going to buy another heavy bag to supplement the heavy bag I already have…thinking of a wrecking ball or an angle bag…what do you suggest? Thank you so much.

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Johnny N April 19, 2013 at 10:01 am

Shadowbox in the mirror and move around. The double-end bag is great and much better on your joints than the heavy bag. I’m 28 now and already feel like I can’t go 100% on the heavy bag because it wrecks my joints. I like the wrecking ball over the angled bag.

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G-unit April 24, 2013 at 1:10 am

Can you please explain what’s the difference between () = rolling
{} = rolling under in a combo set?

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Johnny N April 26, 2013 at 10:11 am

Rolling means rolling a punch off your shoulders from standing position. Rolling under a punch means going under it in the opposite direction of the punch.

(3) means you’re rolling AWAY from the left hook.
{3} mans you’re rolling UNDER the left hook. (Going towards it).

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Evan May 14, 2013 at 11:45 am

Hey Johnny,
Great info on the combos. Few questions. The first one is I have all of the bags… speed, heavy, double end, and slip bag. I’m 35 this year and really don’t have any desire to compete and am to old anyway. I don’t mind a little sparring though many claim they will do some sparring and then back out… and I have a tiny bit of sparring experience. I guess some people are just afraid to get hit lol.

Anyway. I have a bad shoulder so heavy bag impacts don’t feel to good when it comes to that. I also don’t want to hang the bag up in our new house because it shakes the whole thing and will wake our baby up, so that one is out for me. The speed bag has a platform I had built out of 3 pieces of plywood glued and screwed together, but is still loud. I guess those 900.00 platforms are the ones that make the least noise huh? lol. The double end bag seems to be ok, but my question on that is everyone likes a different way that it is strung up. I have mine set to where it will hit me in the face if I don’t get out of the way… even at my own range, but every pro boxer I see has it set like super tight to where there is very little movement on it.

Shadow boxing really is the only thing I have right now ( I use 2 lb dumbells as well) and just work common combinations. I am doing it for fitness, but to build speed and honestly for self defense. Is it enough to help with power as well as speed, reflexes, etc?

My footwork is what isn’t very good though. Is there a video, or particular fight that shows pretty common footwork, but is pretty basic? There are literally NO boxing gyms around here so I have to try to learn the footwork all on my own.

Any overall advice?

Sorry for the long string of questions.

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Johnny N May 17, 2013 at 1:06 pm

Pros like their double-end bags super tight because they have very fast hands and care more about fluidity.

Do not shadowbox with weights.

The typical footwork you see in fights will be the typical fighting footwork. It’s impossible to hold a perfect stance ALL the time unless you’re constantly running and not engaging. A real exchange is supposed to get messy at times.

Practice what you can with that you have. Shadowbox and move around.

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Evan May 17, 2013 at 8:05 pm

Ok, thanks for the advice Johnny. I’ve been watching your videos on youtube, good stuff. Thanks for taking the time to do them for all of us.

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sayan July 21, 2013 at 12:36 am

can u post sum other beginner combos on the heavy bag..i am very bad at hitting the bag and i can get it that i dont get power..but i can shadowbox well..sp ny tips plz!!!1

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Johnny N July 22, 2013 at 5:23 pm

Work on your punching technique. It takes time.

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Brandon R October 4, 2013 at 12:55 pm

Johnny, I’m been watching your videos and training techniques it’s very helpful
I appreciate what you have done your a good teacher but do you know to practice defense and reflexs
At home cuz I would go train at a gym but I don’t have money$$.
Im pretty good in offense my punching techniques improved but I just now want to practice my defense really bad. I’m 16 an I got lots to learn but please get back at me with some advices or techniques about defense at home

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Johnny N October 6, 2013 at 7:05 pm

You need at least someone to do mitt drills with and a sparring partner.

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Brandon R October 6, 2013 at 7:07 pm

Alright, I will thanks man yu really do help bro

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manos October 11, 2013 at 3:44 pm

Have you heard of people teaching the 4 as an uppercut instead of right hook/overhand right, due to the amount of distance/time it takes the right hook to travel from the left hook.

IE:
1 – jab
2 – cross
3 – left hook
4 – right upper
5 – left upper
6 – right hook/overhand right

Thanks!

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Johnny N October 17, 2013 at 7:40 pm

You’re definitely correct. Many trainers teach the system you mentioned but for me it’s less logical when I try to explain it to beginners. And so I like the system I use better. It doesn’t really matter as long as you know the punches. Every trainer you meet may have a slightly different system.

Some catch jabs on the right mitt, some catch jabs on the left. Some use “7” as the left hook to the body, some use “5” as the left hook to the body. I’ve seen numbering systems go up to 14.

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Brandon R October 18, 2013 at 12:53 pm

I got a question about fighting. I don’t know if you would want to answer
This but okay say I get in a fight an the guy rushes at me with punches non stop
An he is bigger than me. I should back away an block until he slows down right

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Johnny N July 23, 2014 at 11:16 am

That’s up to you. It’s not a bad idea.

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David Rush June 28, 2014 at 4:48 am

Johnny
I am a 55 year old martial artist who has been studying traditional martial arts for over 40 years. Your website offers great advice and I wish I had discovered it sooner. Despite my years of training, my fighting style is very static because it is the result of too much basic training in static positions and not enough fluidity. Inspired by your advice I am favouring SLOW shadow boxing and pad work combinations in lieu of my tradional karate training.
There is life in the old dog yet!
Rushman1959

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Johnny N July 23, 2014 at 11:17 am

Very inspiring to see you trying new arts and even boxing at 55, David. Not bad for an old guy. ;)

Reply

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